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Family Star Party-The Planet Inhabited Solely by Robots

Family Star Party-The Planet Inhabited Solely by Robots

Inspire the next generation of astronomy enthusiasts with a fun, learning environment for the whole family.

Event Series:

Family Star Party

July 29 @ 6:00 pm - 9:00 pm MDT

Admission:

Included with Discovery Center Passport. No other coupons or discounts apply. Adults=$5.00 Children (5-17)=$3.00 Children (4 and younger) free.

Location:

Space Foundation Discovery Center

Event Details:

An evening of looking to the stars and discovering the wonders of the universe. This event creates a fun learning environment for the whole family and inspires the next generation of astronomy enthusiasts!

In July 2020, the next NASA Mars Rover, now named “Perseverance” will launch from Earth on a seven-month journey through the void of space. In February 2021, it will arrive at our outer planetary neighbor to begin a brand-new exploration of the red planet as the most advanced rover ever launched. Join us for our July Family Star Party when we will celebrate the launch of this new Mars rover and how Perseverance will be a gateway for the #MarsGeneration to begin a lifetime of learning, loving, and exploring Mars.

Activities include:
• Hands on activities and demonstrations
• Mars Robotics Laboratory open for Mars Rover missions
• Night sky viewing with Colorado Springs Astronomical Society
• Mars presentations on Science On a Sphere®
• Special Presentation and Q & A session… Topic: How NASA conducts a Mars Rover mission

What to look for in the July night sky:

  •  July 5 – Full Moon. The Moon will be located on the opposite side of the Earth as the Sun and its face will be fully illuminated. This full moon was known by early Native American tribes as the Full Buck Moon because the male buck deer would begin to grow their new antlers at this time of year. This moon has also been known as the Full Thunder Moon and the Full Hay Moon.
  •  July 5 – Penumbral Lunar Eclipse. A penumbral lunar eclipse occurs when the Moon passes through the Earth’s partial shadow, or penumbra. During this type of eclipse, the Moon will darken slightly but not completely. The eclipse will be visible throughout most of North America, South America, the eastern Pacific Ocean, the western Atlantic Ocean, and extreme western Africa.
  • July 14 – Jupiter at Opposition. The giant planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Jupiter and its moons. A medium-sized telescope should be able to show you some of the details in Jupiter’s cloud bands. A good pair of binoculars should allow you to see Jupiter’s four largest moons, appearing as bright dots on either side of the planet.
  • July 20 – New Moon. The Moon will be located on the same side of the Earth as the Sun and will not be visible in the night sky. This is the best time of the month to observe faint objects such as galaxies and star clusters because there is no moonlight to interfere.
  • July 20 – Saturn at Opposition. The ringed planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. It will be brighter than any other time of the year and will be visible all night long. This is the best time to view and photograph Saturn and its moons. A medium-sized or larger telescope will allow you to see Saturn’s rings and a few of its brightest moons.
  • July 22 – Mercury at Greatest Western Elongation. The planet Mercury reaches greatest western elongation of 20.1 degrees from the Sun. This is the best time to view Mercury since it will be at its highest point above the horizon in the morning sky. Look for the planet low in the eastern sky just before sunrise.
  • July 28, 29 – Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower. The Delta Aquarids is an average shower that can produce up to 20 meteors per hour at its peak. It is produced by debris left behind by comets Marsden and Kracht. The shower runs annually from July 12 to August 23. It peaks this year on the night of July 28 and morning of July 29. The second quarter moon will block many of the fainter meteors this year. But if you are patient, you should still be able to catch a few of the brighter ones. Best viewing will be from a dark location after midnight. Meteors will radiate from the constellation Aquarius but can appear anywhere in the sky.


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